Posted on

Yogi Berra

Yogi Berra Lawrence Peter was an American professional baseball catcher, manager, and coach who played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball. He was recognized as an 18-time All-Star and a 10-time World Series champion.

Yogi Berra

“Yogi Berra was an American original – a Hall of Famer, jovial prophet, & a humble veteran.” – Barack Obama

Real Name : Lawrence Peter Berra

Positions: Catcher and Outfielder

Bats: Left, Throws: Right

Height: 5′ 7″, Weight: 185 lb.

Born: May 12, 1925 in St. Louis, MO

Signed by: The New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1943

Debut: September 22, 1946 (Age 21.133, 7,924th in MLB history) PHA 4 AB, 2 H, 1 HR, 2 RBI, 0 SB

Rookie Status: Exceeded rookie limits during 1947 season [*]

Teams (by GP): Yankees/Mets 1946-1965

Last Game: May 9, 1965 (Age 39.362) vs. MLN 4 AB, 0 H, 0 HR, 0 RBI, 0 SB Inducted into the Hall of Fame by BBWAA as Player in 1972 (339/396 ballots).

Died: September 22, 2015 in West Caldwell, NJ (Aged 90.133)

Buried: Gate of Heaven Catholic Cemetery, East Hanover,NJ

Relatives: Father of Dale Berra

Yogi Berra Fairytale Career

Standing at a mere five-foot-seven, Yogi Berra was often overlooked througout his career as the runt of the litter and an undersized player that was in way over his head. Proving everyone wrong, Berra went on to win the most valuable player in the American League award on three occassions, and played in more World Series games than any other player in history.

One of five children of Italian immigrants, Berra played sports with his three older brothers while growing up. He dropped out of school to help his family in the eighth grade, but still found time to develop his athletic talents. In his teens, Berra got serious about baseball. It was during this time he earned his famous nickname, from a friend who said he resembled a Indian yogi.

Berra was playing American Legion baseball when he and neighborhood friend Joe Garagiola caught the attention of St. Louis Cardinals general manager Branch Rickey. Offered a $250 signing bonus, half the amount given to his friend, Berra rejected the opportunity to play for his hometown big league team, and later signed with the New York Yankees.

Yogi Berra serving US Navy

After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, Yogi Berra became one of the Yankees’ catchers in 1946. He soon earned a reputation as a hitter who made hard contact on anything near the plate, rarely striking out. He hit his career peak in the 1950s, winning three Most Valuable Player Awards between 1951 and 1955.

Additionally, he worked well with his pitchers, notably helping Don Larsen achieve a rare perfect game in the 1956 World Series. Berra was also not above trying to psych out the other team; according to his website, he talked to the batters, including Hank Aaron, to distract them.

Berra appeared in his final game for the Yankees in 1963. In all, he played in 18 All-Star Games and helped the Yankees reach the World Series 14 times, winning a remarkable 10 championships. Regarded as one of the best catchers in history, he was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1972.

To top off his outstanding accomplishements, Yogi Berra was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., in 1972.Yogi Berra would don a Yankees uniform again as a manager, leading the Yankees to the American League pennant 1964, and briefly again in the mid-1980s.

One of five children of Italian immigrants, Berra played sports with his three older brothers while growing up. He dropped out of school to help his family in the eighth grade, but still found time to develop his athletic talents. In his teens, Berra got serious about baseball. It was during this time he earned his famous nickname, from a friend who said he resembled a Hindu yogi.

Berra was playing American Legion baseball when he and neighborhood friend Joe Garagiola caught the attention of St. Louis Cardinals general manager Branch Rickey. Offered a $250 signing bonus, half the amount given to his friend, Berra rejected the opportunity to play for his hometown big league team, and later signed with the New York Yankees.

Wit and wisdom of Yogi Berra

On getting enough rest:

“I usually take a two-hour nap from one to four.”

On “fan” mail:

“Never answer an anonymous letter.”

On education:

“I’m not going to buy my kids an encyclopedia. Let them walk to school like I did.” “You can observe a lot by watching.”

On the future:

“The future ain’t what it used to be.”

On travel:

“If you don’t know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else.” “Why buy good luggage, you only use it when you travel.” “The towels were so thick there I could hardly close my suitcase.” “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.”

On social life:

“Nobody goes there anymore, it’s too crowded.” “It gets late early out here.”

On youth sports:

“I think Little League is wonderful. It keeps the kids out of the house.”

On the human anatomy:

“I don’t know (if they were male or female) fans running naked across the field. They had bags over their heads.”

On receiving advice:

“Take it with a grin of salt.”

On weather:

“It ain’t the heat, it’s the humility.”

On finance:

“A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.”

On baseball:

“In baseball, you don’t know nothing.” “We made too many wrong mistakes.” “So I’m ugly. I never saw anyone hit with his face.” “If the people don’t want to come out to the ballpark, nobody’s going to stop them.” “Baseball is 90 percent mental. The other half is physical.” “All pitchers are liars or crybabies.” “We were overwhelming underdogs.” “Bill Dickey is learning me his experience.”